Gamo Hunter 440 [ 22cal ] Reviews



Review on:

Gamo Hunter 440 [ 22cal ]


Star Rating:
Reviewer: Vince
Recommended: Recommended
Thumbs Up: 170
Thumbs Down: 159
Posted On:

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The Gamo Hunter is essentially identical to the Gamo Shadow (which can be had for a lot less) with the exception of the rear sight, the scope rail, and the stock.

The stock is certainly a decent piece of wood, finished in a dark walnut and nicely shaped. Mine has a significant blemish, but because it was a refurb at $95, I’m not getting too torqued up about it.

Shooting the gun is just like shooting a Shadow (with a slightly different feel from the stock)… that means moderate spring twang, the take-it-or-leave-it trigger, solid breach lock-up, and very decent accuracy. Power-wise, this one’s down a bit (880 with CPL’s) compared to the Shadow’s I’ve got, but being a refurb I’ve got no idea how much mileage is already on this thing. So I’ll wait for it to break in a bit more before making a final judgment on that.

The rear sight is somewhat different, it is Gamo’s “Micro-metric” (as opposed to “milli-metric”) rear sight. Franky, I don’t see the advantage – there’s no numbers on the elevation dial, and raising the sight to the height necessary for 60 yards means that the detent stops working (because of the angle of the sight platform). And because of the lack of numbers, it’s harder to tell if the windage adjustment creeps with use.

In any case, it cocks smoothly and shot fairly well right out of the box – and after the nightmare I had (and am still having) with a Benjamin-Legacy 1000, this is a nice change.

All in all, I’m pleased with it. I don’t see how it’s worth the significant premium over the Shadow (or the 220) unless you REALLY like the wood… but it’s not a bad gun, and there’s certainly no reason to stay away from it.


Review on:

Gamo Hunter 440 [ 22cal ]


Star Rating:
Reviewer: Wing
Recommended: Recommended
Thumbs Up: 195
Thumbs Down: 157
Posted On:

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I bought a used Gamo Hunter (.22) and was quite impressed with it’s accuracy up to 25 yards. It had good power, although I believe the breech seal might be leaking… remember, I’m a novice with the workings of air-rifles! At 25 Yards it will throw a 10 shot 1/2″ pattern in a dead still wind. It does drop a bit on a damp morning, which is why it hasn’t gone hunting yet, but will still maintain a solid 1/2″ pattern under the same conditions.

It’s also a sweetheart to cock… for most folks. My wife can even cock it once, but it does take a serious effort for her… the big sissy! She’s got arthritis pretty bad so we don’t tease her too much if we can help it. It’s a very comfortable for even an artritic to shoot.

Pigeons, starlings, and chippies do not stand a chance with this little rifle hanging at the back door, or in the henhouse, but it’s such a nice looking rifle I hate leaving it out there with the dust.

My sons have all shot this little rifle and all were tickled with it’s accuracy, but they too felt the power was lacking considerably… especially after shooting the RWS-34.

Balistics tests showed it only penitrating 5 layers of cardboard with a pointed pellet, where the RWS-34 went in 9.

I have no way of measuring speed, so the cardboard is my only way of getting a good feel of power.I would not use it to tag a coon, unless the coon was in my trap and I was a foot away using a wadcutter to the back of the head. I don’t feel there is enough power for it to make a hollow point effective (at this point in time). I don’t give points easily for anything, but with the comfort, ease of operation, looks, and noise level, I will give it a solid 3 1/2.

Once I get the seal replaced, my recommendation will most likely go higher, but until I see what the additional power does to a pellet I have to stay right there.